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Dermatologic Disquisitions and Other Essays Edited by Philip R. Cohen, MD| Volume 40, ISSUE 6, P808-809, November 2022

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ABA supports AMA regarding monkeypox name change: A satire

Open AccessPublished:August 07, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2022.08.007

      Abstract

      The names of organizations, teams, and medical conditions can elicit controversy when presumedly unintentional defamation of a subset of individuals is perceived. Indeed, this has recently resulted in changing the names of sports teams and diseases. Previously, the ABA (American Baboon Association) solicited the other ABA (American Bar Association), and the drug reaction initially described to as baboon syndrome is now appropriately referred to as symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema (SDRIFE). Currently, the AMA (American Monkey Association)—with the support of the ABA (American Baboon Association) —has notified the other AMA (American Medical Association) that they consider the name monkeypox unacceptable for this viral infection. The ABA (American Baboon Association) and the AMA (American Monkey Association) are fictional organizations created by the author for the purpose of this satire.

      Keywords

      Introduction

      Names are given to organizations, teams, and conditions. Recently, the Washington Redskins football team in the United States decided to change their team's name to the Washington Commanders as a tribute to Washington's military ties; the team's former name was considered to be denigrating to the identity and culture of Native Americans.

      Bowman E: For many Native Americans, the Washington Commanders’ new name offers some closure. Available at: https://www.npr.org/2022/02/06/1078571919/washington-commanders-name-change-native-americans Accessed October 3, 2022.

      Similarly, nomenclature in medicine has also been changed so that specific groups of individuals are not ostracized; for example, Norwegian scabies is more appropriately now referred to as crusted scabies or scabies surrepticius.
      • Niode NJ
      • Adji A
      • Gazpers S
      • et al.
      Crusted scabies, a neglected tropical disease: case series and literature review.
      ,
      • Cohen PR
      Scabies masquerading as bullous pemphigoid: scabies surrepticius.

      Discussion

      Baboon syndrome

      Several years ago, the ABA (American Baboon Association) solicited the other ABA (American Bar Association) regarding baboon syndrome as the name designated for the dramatic and distinctive drug reaction that was clinically characterized by asymptomatic, bilateral, and symmetric erythema of the buttocks similar to the red presentation of the corresponding area of a baboon. After multiple protests and heated debates, a decision in favor of the ABA (American Baboon Association) was declared. The skin condition is now referred to as symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema (SDRIFE).
      • Cohen PR
      Zoledronic acid-associated symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema (SDRIFE): report of baboon syndrome in a woman with recurrent metastatic breast cancer after receiving zoledronic acid.

      Monkeypox

      More recently, an outbreak of monkeypox virus (MPVX) infection has occurred.
      • Hraib M
      • Jouni S
      • Albitar MM
      • Alaidi S
      • Alshehabi Z
      The outbreak of monkeypox 2022: an overview.
      ,

      Gong Q, Wang C, Chuai X, Chiu S: Monkeypox virus: a re-emergent threat to humans [e-pub ahead of print]. Virol Sin. doi:10.1016/j.virs.2022.07.006 Accessed October 3, 2022.

      Although the natural reservoir for this orthopoxvirus is rodents, monkeys are capable of passing the virus to humans
      • Hraib M
      • Jouni S
      • Albitar MM
      • Alaidi S
      • Alshehabi Z
      The outbreak of monkeypox 2022: an overview.
      ,

      Martin-Delgado MC, Martin Sanchez FJ, Martinez-Selles MD, et al. Monkeypox in humans: a new outbreak [e-pub ahead of print]. Rev Esp Quimioter. doi:10.37201/req/059.2022 Accessed October 3, 2022.

      ; however, the new outbreak of monkeypox virus infection appears to be transmitted predominantly by men who have sex with men.

      Martin-Delgado MC, Martin Sanchez FJ, Martinez-Selles MD, et al. Monkeypox in humans: a new outbreak [e-pub ahead of print]. Rev Esp Quimioter. doi:10.37201/req/059.2022 Accessed October 3, 2022.

      Orviz E, Negredo A, Ayerdi O, et al. Monkeypox outbreak in Madrid (Spain): clinical and virological aspects [e-pub ahead of print]. J Infect. doi:10.1016/j.jinf.2022.07.005 (online ahead of print) Accessed October 3, 2022.

      Girometti N, Byrne R, Bracchi M, et al. Demographic and clinical characteristics of confirmed human monkeypox virus cases in individuals attending a sexual health centre in London, UK: an observational analysis [e-pub ahead of print]. Lancet Infect Dis. doi:10.1016/S1473-3099(22)00411-X Accessed October 3, 2022.

      Cutaneous manifestations of monkeypox virus infection are variable, including umbilicated vesicles and pustules.
      • Hraib M
      • Jouni S
      • Albitar MM
      • Alaidi S
      • Alshehabi Z
      The outbreak of monkeypox 2022: an overview.

      Gong Q, Wang C, Chuai X, Chiu S: Monkeypox virus: a re-emergent threat to humans [e-pub ahead of print]. Virol Sin. doi:10.1016/j.virs.2022.07.006 Accessed October 3, 2022.

      Martin-Delgado MC, Martin Sanchez FJ, Martinez-Selles MD, et al. Monkeypox in humans: a new outbreak [e-pub ahead of print]. Rev Esp Quimioter. doi:10.37201/req/059.2022 Accessed October 3, 2022.

      Orviz E, Negredo A, Ayerdi O, et al. Monkeypox outbreak in Madrid (Spain): clinical and virological aspects [e-pub ahead of print]. J Infect. doi:10.1016/j.jinf.2022.07.005 (online ahead of print) Accessed October 3, 2022.

      Girometti N, Byrne R, Bracchi M, et al. Demographic and clinical characteristics of confirmed human monkeypox virus cases in individuals attending a sexual health centre in London, UK: an observational analysis [e-pub ahead of print]. Lancet Infect Dis. doi:10.1016/S1473-3099(22)00411-X Accessed October 3, 2022.

      Worldwide monkey concern

      Monkeys worldwide have become concerned. Monkeys are alarmed that they are now considered to be associated with a zoonotic viral infection. Indeed, monkeys of all species—including the baboons—have begun to take action.

      Baboons support monkeys

      It is not surprising that the AMA (American Monkey Association) has notified the other AMA (American Medical Association) that they consider the name designated for this condition to be unacceptable. In addition, the ABA (American Baboon Association) strongly supports the AMA (American Monkey Association). They have already contacted the ABA (American Bar Association) to begin legal proceedings to have the name changed.

      Monkeys take action

      In addition, the AMA (American Monkey Association) has contacted physicians throughout the United States to send letters not only to the other AMA (American Medical Association), but also to their senators and representative in State government to promote changing the name of monkeypox. The AMA (American Monkey Association) is concerned that the current disease designation will inhibit people from coming to visit them at local zoos, wildlife habitats, and Africa-based safaris. Because rodents are a vector for monkeypox, the AMA (American Monkey Association) has suggested that the virus be called rodentpox; however, the AARP (American Association of Rodent Partners) would likely vigorously object to this name; the opinion of the other AARP (America Association of Retired Persons) is not known.

      Conclusions

      The ABA (American Bar Association) and AMA (American Medical Association) are established society organizations. However, the other ABA (American Baboon Association) and the other AMA (American Monkey Association) are fictional organizations that have been created by the author's imagination. Monkeypox viral infection has been associated with significant anxiety and stress. Hopefully, this short satire can provide a brief respite not only for the physicians and their patients, but also for the monkeys.

      Conflict of interest

      Dr Cohen is a consultant for ParaPRO.

      References

      1. Bowman E: For many Native Americans, the Washington Commanders’ new name offers some closure. Available at: https://www.npr.org/2022/02/06/1078571919/washington-commanders-name-change-native-americans Accessed October 3, 2022.

        • Niode NJ
        • Adji A
        • Gazpers S
        • et al.
        Crusted scabies, a neglected tropical disease: case series and literature review.
        Infect Dis Rep. 2022; 14: 479-491
        • Cohen PR
        Scabies masquerading as bullous pemphigoid: scabies surrepticius.
        Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. 2017; 10: 317-324
        • Cohen PR
        Zoledronic acid-associated symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema (SDRIFE): report of baboon syndrome in a woman with recurrent metastatic breast cancer after receiving zoledronic acid.
        Dermatol Online J. 2015; 21 (13030/qt5kk0g864)
        • Hraib M
        • Jouni S
        • Albitar MM
        • Alaidi S
        • Alshehabi Z
        The outbreak of monkeypox 2022: an overview.
        Ann Med Surg (Lond). 2022; 79104069
      2. Gong Q, Wang C, Chuai X, Chiu S: Monkeypox virus: a re-emergent threat to humans [e-pub ahead of print]. Virol Sin. doi:10.1016/j.virs.2022.07.006 Accessed October 3, 2022.

      3. Martin-Delgado MC, Martin Sanchez FJ, Martinez-Selles MD, et al. Monkeypox in humans: a new outbreak [e-pub ahead of print]. Rev Esp Quimioter. doi:10.37201/req/059.2022 Accessed October 3, 2022.

      4. Orviz E, Negredo A, Ayerdi O, et al. Monkeypox outbreak in Madrid (Spain): clinical and virological aspects [e-pub ahead of print]. J Infect. doi:10.1016/j.jinf.2022.07.005 (online ahead of print) Accessed October 3, 2022.

      5. Girometti N, Byrne R, Bracchi M, et al. Demographic and clinical characteristics of confirmed human monkeypox virus cases in individuals attending a sexual health centre in London, UK: an observational analysis [e-pub ahead of print]. Lancet Infect Dis. doi:10.1016/S1473-3099(22)00411-X Accessed October 3, 2022.

      Biography

      Dr. Philip R. Cohen is an adjunct Professor in the Department of Dermatology at the University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California and at Touro University California College of Osteopathic Medicine, Vallejo, California.
      Dr. Cohen received his BA degree at Franklin & Marshall College and his medical degree from New York Medical College. He completed one-year of medical internship, medical residency, and dermatology research fellowship at The University of Texas-Houston Medical School. He completed his residency in Dermatology at The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University in New York. He completed two more fellowships in Houston, Texas: Dermatopathology at The University of Texas-Houston Medical School and Mohs Micrographic Surgery at the Dermatologic Surgery Center.
      Dr. Cohen's interests in dermatology are diverse. In addition, he has enjoyed the opportunity to mentor students in writing medical literature. He has also been a prolific writer with nearly 1000 publications in peer-reviewed literature.
      Dr. Cohen ran his 20th Houston marathon on January 18, 2015; he still occasionally runs half marathons. Dr. Cohen is married to Dr. Razelle Kurzrock; they have had several collaborations during the last 37 years, including four children and, more recently, four Basenjis. Dr. Cohen also enjoys grilling on the weekends.