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Annular drug eruptions

      Abstract

      Cutaneous adverse drug reactions are undesirable cutaneous changes caused by medications. Drug eruptions can mimic a wide range of dermatoses that include exanthematous (morbilliform), urticarial, pustular, bullous, papulosquamous, or granulomatous lesions, and sometimes these eruptions may present with annular, polycyclic, or polymorphous configurations. The correct identification of a cutaneous drug eruption depends on a high index of suspicion, detailed medication exposure history, chronologic evaluation of the causal relationships between drug exposures and eruptions, and the exclusion of other infectious or idiopathic diseases. Most drug eruptions are annoying but self-limited, usually resolving after the withdrawal of the causative agents. Rarely, patients have severe cutaneous adverse reactions, such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), which are potentially lethal adverse drug reactions that involve the skin and mucous membranes and may also damage internal organs. Prompt recognition of the alarming signs of severe cutaneous adverse reactions and providing adequate treatment may thus be life-saving. We present the main clinical presentations, histopathology, possible implicated medications, and treatment of cutaneous adverse drug reactions that can present in annular configurations.
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