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Nutrition and nonmelanoma skin cancers

      Abstract

      Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), the most widely diagnosed cancer in the United States, is rising in incidence despite public health and educational campaigns that highlight the importance of sun avoidance. It is,therefore, important to establish other modifiable risk factors that may be contributing to this increase. There is a growing body of evidence in the literature suggesting certain nutrients may have protective or harmful effects on NMSC. We review the current literature on nutrition and its effect on NMSC with a focus on dietary fat, vitamin A, nicotinamide, folate, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin E, polyphenols, and selenium.
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