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Skin manifestations in acromegaly

      Abstract

      Cutaneous changes in acromegaly result from excess GH and IGF-1 action on skin cells and adnexae. Skin puffiness due to dermal glycosaminoglycan accumulation and edema are most prominent in the face, hands and feet. Oily skin with large pores, hypertrichosis, and excessive sweating are common features. Pigmented skin tags, acanthosis nigricans, and psoriasis are also encountered. Alteration in skin capillaries produce increased vasoconstriction. Discerning these changes contributes to early diagnosis and treatment of this high-morbidity disorder. Controlling GH and IGF-1 over-secretion alleviates most cutaneous manifestations of acromegaly; however, regression may be incomplete.
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