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Dry skin and moisturizers

      A lmost every person will experience dry skin during his or her lifetime.
      • Spencer T.S
      Dry skin and skin moisturizers.
      Many people experience occasional episodes, but some have a chronic problem with xerosis that is irritating and troublesome. In people with an atopic diathesis, dry skin can progress to eczema. Moisturizers are the mainstay of treatment for dry skin, daily maintenance of normal skin, and adjunctive therapy for many skin diseases.

      Loden M. Biophysical properties of dry and normal skin with special reference to effects of skin care products. Acta Derm Venereol (Stockh) 1995;Suppl 192:1–48.

      This chapter will discuss dryness of the skin and moisturization.
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